Auckland War Museum Cenotaph

Some typical questions:

I don’t see my grandfather’s name on the Cenotaph database and he was a returned soldier from WW II. Why is that? 

Elias, M D, fl 1943. Laying a railway line in Libya during World War II - Photograph taken by M D Elias. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: DA-06759-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22721777 “Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

Elias, M D, fl 1943. Laying a railway line in Libya during World War II – Photograph taken by M D Elias. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: DA-06759-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22721777
“Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

Answer: Not all returned service personnel are on the Roll. Those that are known to feature are those who served with the 28th Maori Battalion those who have had family provide to the Museum the full military personnel file along with biographical notes with their request for inclusion and some more recent entries as a result of the liasons the museum has made with other sources.

My grandmother’s name is on the Cenotaph Database, but some of the information there is not correct. What can I do about that?

Answer: In the first instance you may like to get in touch with the Armoury Information Centre at the Auckland War Memorial Museum either by email or by phone. The email address is armoury@aucklandmuseum.com and the phone number: (09) 309 0443.

What might I expect to find when I undertake a search of the database?

Answer: That depends. You may come up empty-handed, but, if the person who you are looking for is there, then the record may contain all or some of the following (and this is not exhaustive).

* Much of the information presently available on the Nominal (Embarkation) rolls

* Embarkation details, e.g. embarkation unit, embarkation date, place of embarkation, transport, vessel and destination

* Birth, death and sometimes cemetery details

* If the person listed was killed or otherwise died while on active service, where died or killed and where buried or memorialised (with grave and memorial references).

* Other memorials, here in New Zealand, where killed or otherwise died on active service

Kaye, George Frederick, 1914-2004. Soldier at the Cassino battlefront, Italy. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: DA-05514. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22818051 “Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

Kaye, George Frederick, 1914-2004. Soldier at the Cassino battlefront, Italy. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: DA-05514. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22818051
“Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

* Other names known by, including nick-names

* If a Prisoner of War (POW), information pertaining to date and place of capture and place of detention.

* Military awards and the award circumstances

* Service in other units and last unit in which served

* Pre war military experience

* Biographical notes. These can be an absolute wealth of information. They may include details of other family members who enlisted (thereby offering you other research possibilities), accounts of engagements, including those in which the serviceman was killed, details of wounds sustained, short biographical histories of specific engagements, diary accounts (often humorous),  pre and post war bio notes, post war occupations (including post war military service), details of other awards received, summaries of appointments and roles held, marital and family details .. and much more besides.

* Description of accompanying images

* Sources used

*Further references including links to useful websites.

 

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