Problems encountered

Problems encountered in the course of this research:

Before I go on to discuss the problems inherent in this type of compilation, I am confident that as many as 90% of the entries in these four columns mesh correctly with the other information recorded in the database.  As regards the other 10% or so, I have adopted a best case scenario approachIn the course of time inevitably some of the information I have attributed to this small percentage will prove incorrect.  Knowing full well that this is likely to occur, I apologise in advance. A professional genealogist might shudder at this but in the end it came down to a matter of leaving out this information altogether or going with what I intuitively sensed, ‘fitted’.

These were some of the things I found

  1. Incorrect names or spelling of names either on the rolls or in the BMD  or  cemetery records: Example: Roy Frederick Dodds. The database has been  updated where  errors as obvious as this exist.

World War II soldiers, Western Desert, North Africa. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: 1/4-019386-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23119530 “Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

World War II soldiers, Western Desert, North Africa. New Zealand. Department of Internal Affairs. War History Branch :Photographs relating to World War 1914-1918, World War 1939-1945, occupation of Japan, Korean War, and Malayan Emergency. Ref: 1/4-019386-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23119530
“Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.”

  1. A plethora of common names showing up on the death index.  For example, for the likes of a common name like William Davis, such are the multiple entries in the BMD that it has been all but impossible to make a correct choice, unless some further cue is found in the cemetery databases. Even then I have tended to exercise both caution and discretion sometimes preferring to leave the four columns blank. In the case of Wilfred Jeffs you will see that three entries come up, but any one of these entries could relate to the serviceman in question. So, again, the columns have been left blank. Notwithstanding that, I strongly recommend that any researcher armed with accurate facts pertaining to either birth or death and/or burial/cremation return to the death index to zero in on the correct entry, so as to fill in the needed blanks.
  1. A second Christian name showing up in either Nominal rolls or in the death and/or cemetery records. Again I have dealt with these on a case by case basis. If the year of death in the index tied in with a death date entered per the cemetery database this may have been enough to swing it, especially so if the surname is not that common. Refer to Edward Huxtable in the roll; in the BMD the name is entered as Edward Giffney Huxtable. Huxtable is an uncommon name so there is a very strong likelihood that this is one and the same person.

4. A reversal of Christian names shows in the BMD.  Again where the surname is not that  common  I have opted to include. Example: Alan Henry Hawley-Drew.

5. Age at death per the death record not matching with age shown on the burial records.

It should not be forgotten that some veterans have died overseas, thus making it all but impossible in most cases to zero in on a date of death. Also .. a good number are still alive.

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